Tuesday, October 20, 2009

You Might be a Constitutionalist...

By Chuck Baldwin,
October 20, 2009

Archived Article

I originally published this column back in January of 2005. Since then (and especially lately), many people have called and written with requests to republish it. So, with a few minor revisions, here it is.

More than thirty years as a student of American history, constitutional government, and the Holy Bible leads me to the conviction that the two major political parties in this country (at the national level) are equally culpable in stripping America of its founding principles. In my opinion,
both the Democrat and Republican parties in Washington, D.C., have zero fidelity to the U.S. Constitution and zero respect for America's foundational precepts.

In my studied opinion, neither the Democrat nor Republican Party (at the national level) has any intention of slowing the out-of-control expansion of government. Neither party has demonstrated any loyalty to preserving and protecting our constitutional form of government.

Like National Socialists and Soviet Socialists of old, the only thing that concerns Democrats and Republicans today is who is in power. Both are equally willing to destroy the freedoms and liberties of people without conscience or regret as long as their party remains in control.

I am absolutely convinced that without a renewed allegiance to constitutional government and State sovereignty, there can be no resolution to America's current slide into socialism and oppression. Therefore, it is critical that we cast aside our infatuation with partisan politics and
steadfastly stand firm for the principles of federalism and freedom, as did America's founders.

Might you be a modern-day Minuteman who understands the principles of freedom and federalism? I offer the following test. Read it and see if you, too, are a Constitutionalist. (Yes, Martha, this is another Jeff Foxworthy spin-off.)

1. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe that every congressman, senator, President, and Supreme Court justice is required to obey the U.S. Constitution.

2. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe that before the United States invades and occupies another country, Congress must first declare war.

3. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe the federal government should live within its means, like everyone else is forced to do.

4. You might be a Constitutionalist if you think that taking away people's liberties in the name of security is not patriotic, nor does it make the country more secure.

5. You might be a Constitutionalist if you would like to see politicians be forced to abide by the same laws they make everyone else submit to.

6. You might be a Constitutionalist if you understand that we have three "separate but equal" branches of government that are supposed to hold each other in check and balance.

7. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe that the federal government has no authority to be involved in education or law enforcement, or in any other issue that the Tenth Amendment reserves to the States, or to the People.

8. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe that gun control laws do nothing but aid and abet criminals while trampling the rights and freedoms of law-abiding citizens.

9. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe that the income tax is both unconstitutional and immoral, and, along with the I.R.S. and the Federal Reserve, should be abolished.

10. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe the federal government had no authority to tell former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore that he could not display a monument containing the Ten Commandments in the Alabama Judicial Building in Montgomery; or to tell a Pace, Florida, high school principal that he could not pray before a meal.

11. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe that Congress or the White House or any sovereign State is not required to submit to unconstitutional Supreme Court rulings.

12. You might be a Constitutionalist if you understand that freedom has nothing in common with illegal immigration.

13. You might be a Constitutionalist if you understand that outsourcing American jobs overseas is not good for America.

14. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe that the United States should get out of the United Nations and get the United Nations out of the United States.

15. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe that it is not unconstitutional for children in public schools to pray or read the Bible.

16. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe that the Boy Scouts are not a threat to America.

17. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe that the federal government should honor its commitments to America's veterans and stop using U.S. military personnel as guinea pigs for testing drugs and chemicals.

18. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe that U.S. troops should never serve under foreign commanders or wear the uniform or insignia of the United Nations, and that they must never submit to illegal orders, such as turning their weapons against American citizens, or confiscating the guns of U.S. citizens.

19. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe that the federal government has no business bribing churches and faith-based organizations with federal tax dollars.

20. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe that federal agents who murder American citizens should be held to the same laws and punishments that any other citizen would be held to. (Can anyone say, "Waco" and "Ruby Ridge"?)

21. You might be a Constitutionalist if you understand that NAFTA, GATT, the WTO, and the FTAA (and similar agreements) are disastrous compromises of America's national sovereignty and independence.

22. You might be a Constitutionalist if you would like to see congressmen and senators be required to actually read a bill before passing it into law.

23. You might be a Constitutionalist if you understand that it is the job of government to protect and secure God-given rights, not use its power to take those rights away.

24. You might be a Constitutionalist if you understand that there is nothing unconstitutional about the public acknowledgement of God and our Christian heritage.

25. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe that government bailouts and "stimulus" expenditures defy virtually every principle of free enterprise and are a flagrant leap into socialism.

26. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe that airport screeners have no business touching women's breasts, using sophisticated machinery to look through passengers' clothing to see their naked bodies, confiscating fingernail clippers, or denying pilots from carrying handguns.

27. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe that many public schools' "zero-tolerance" policies are just plain stupid.

28. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe that parents have a right to homeschool their children.

29. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe that governmental seizure of private property is plain, old-fashioned thievery.

30. You might be a Constitutionalist if you are personally determined to not submit to any kind of forced vaccination.

31. You might be a Constitutionalist if you oppose any kind of national health insurance.

32. You might be a Constitutionalist if you believe that U.S. troops are not the world's policemen, that they are not "nation-builders," and that their purpose is only to defend American lives and property, not to be the enforcement arm of international commercial interests or global elitists.

33. You might be a Constitutionalist if you understand that the county Sheriff is the highest law enforcement officer of his district and that federal law enforcement (much of which is unconstitutionally organized, anyway) is obligated to submit to his authority.

34. You might be a Constitutionalist if you are determined to oppose America's merger with any kind of regional, hemispheric, or international government, such as the North American Union.

35. You might be a Constitutionalist if you oppose sending billions of taxpayer dollars as foreign aid; the U.S. State Department meddling into the private affairs of foreign countries; and ubiquitous foreign entanglements that require vast sums of money, create animosity and hostility towards us, and expose us to foreign wars and conflicts in which we have no national
interest.

36. You might be a Constitutionalist if you would like to meet one single congressman or senator besides Ron Paul who acts as if he or she has ever read the U.S. Constitution.

Well, how did you fare? Are you a Constitutionalist? If so, your country desperately needs you to stand up and fight for freedom's principles before they are forever taken from us. This means never again voting for anyone--from any party--who will not preserve, protect, and defend the U.S. Constitution. So, don't just take the test; make the pledge!


Note- I disagree with #10. Judge Roy Moore was wrong, and any public show of faith (praying, posting 10 commandments) by a public official is wrong and unconstitutional. #24 is also iffy- I think you all know where I stand there. ;)

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4 comments:

suntzusays said...

#13/21 doesn't seem consistent with the Constitution or the people involved. They were, with a few key exceptions (Hamilton), big believers in free trade and exchange. The tariffs and taxes therein made legal by Constitutional edict were to be used as state revenue sources and not protectionist measures for the development of American industries over some other country's tradesmen.

Several of these have highly compelling externalities, for instance #30, that would make it extremely unwise that any level of government (state and local included) shouldn't compel people to accept a vaccination mandate in the interest of public health. The utilitarian arguments here are very strong that it is promoting harm reductions to reduce or eliminate disease from a population under one's jurisdiction through vaccination.

#3 "that governments at any level do not have the ability to borrow and spend" when emergent circumstances (such as a war) require it. State governments for example during the first half of the 19th century were overwhelmingly in high levels of debt while funding various public projects. The key distinction is that these circumstances are limited in my world (generally to cases of high externality costs/benefits, like public health, though not necessarily public health care, or in the classical case, education) while they do not appear to be in the view of the public sector at any point in our history.

And naturally I am inclined to agree that public expressions of a particular article of faith by state institutions are unacceptable (though private expressions by public, state elected or appointed figures are) and that this is even a Constitutionally settled matter. Which makes #24 and #10 highly suspect. As well as #11. I'm not really sure what "unconstitutional Supreme Court rulings" is supposed to mean.

Also, I am personally highly skeptical of #22's value. Understanding or being reasonably and reliably informed suffices over having read every page.

Christopher said...

Sorry, I'm afraid I didn't pass. Fortunately, I don't have to be tagged a Constitutionalist to understand that the Constitution is the supreme law--to all citizens. If these rules are necessary to fully support the Constitution, then there must have been a few amendments made over night that I didn't hear about.

Good writing in the article, anyways. I definitely agree that both the Democrat and Republican parties are straying somewhat from the Constitution.

Liberty said...

I definitely don't agree with Mr. Baldwin completely, but the spirit of the article is what matters. :)

Bard said...

13 has nothing to do with the Constitution.

22 makes total sense to me. In addition to reading it, I think they have an obligation to make it reasonably understandable to the average citizen.

26 is tough, security is important. I would tend to say it should be up to the airlines to determine what measures they take to secure their flights, but I really haven't give alternatives much thought. I am definately cool with some sort of arming of pilots.

The Ten Commandments in a court house, eh, doesn't bother me too much, it is an example of law. I have a hard time when a judge commisions the work and then has it placed in the court house. I would also have a problem with other religious works (not law related) being place in public buildings.

Government is WAY to big, to involved in our lives, and taking too much of our money to do it. Both parties are guilty of assulting our liberty, that is for sure.